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The National Union of Public and General Employees has a large and growing pool of active retirees who make a powerful, political force across the country.

Bigger, Stronger

The number of retirees is going to accelerate dramatically over the next several decades as baby boomers begin turning 65. About one million union members could retire in the next 10 years and today's retirees are living a lot longer than past generations. They are healthier, more mobile and more active in their communities.

Political Clout

Half Of Canadians Forced Into Retirement; Union Members, Public Sector Workers Better Off

Nearly half of retired Canadians were forced to leave the workforce earlier than they planned, according to a survey from Angus Reid.

The poll shows working in the public sector or being a union member has its benefits when it comes to retirement. Both those groups reported a lower rate of being forced into early retirement, and a lower likelihood of financial problems.

It's another war on drugs!

The Ontario Government declared it, and it affects everyone who works for, or is retired from, the Ontario Public Service (about 100,000 people).

The government wants to reduce access to drug benefits dramatically.

Current drug coverage is 90 per cent of the drug’s cost, less a $3 deductible per prescription.

The government wants to create a three-tiered system. Tier 1 drugs would be covered 90 per cent;,Tier 2 drugs, 50 per cent;, Tier 3 drugs 20 per cent. You pay the rest.

It's another war on drugs!

The Ontario Government declared it, and it affects everyone who works for, or is retired from, the Ontario Public Service (about 100,000 people).

 

The government wants to reduce access to drug benefits dramatically.

Current drug coverage is 90 per cent of the drug’s cost, less a $3 deductible per prescription.

The government wants to create a three-tiered system. Tier 1 drugs would be covered 90 per cent;,Tier 2 drugs, 50 per cent;, Tier 3 drugs 20 per cent. You pay the rest.

Seniors the runaway winners in pre-election budget

ROB CARRICK, OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail

It pays to have seniority.

In a budget that will take the federal government into the next election, seniors are the clear winners. They get more elbow room to manage withdrawals from their registered retirement income funds and a new tax credit to make their homes more accessible. They are also major beneficiaries of the new $10,000 annual contribution limit for tax-free savings accounts and some financial help for people who look after gravely ill relatives.

Seniors in Ontario make up 30% of bankruptcies: report

Retiring with debt a recipe for tight cash flow and future insolvency.

Seniors and those approaching retirement are making up a growing proportion of those filing for insolvency in Ontario and have bigger debts compared to younger people, a report said Monday.

And while credit card debt makes up the largest portion for them, payday loans are a growing concern for seniors, said Doug Hoyes, co-founder of bankruptcy trustee firm Hoyes, Michalos & Associates Inc. which did the report.

Newfoundland government does not expect to collect all pension overpayments

A Newfoundland and Labrador government pledge to be fair and understanding to recipients of pension overpayments over the last two decades will likely mean not all of the nearly $1 million will be collected, says Finance Minister Ross Wiseman.

In an interview Wednesday with CBC's St. John's Morning Show, Wiseman emphasized that the province has a legal obligation to try to recoup the roughly $935,000 paid out in error to nearly 430 public-service pensioners.

NDP would prohibit changes to pension plans: Mulcair

by Elizabeth Thompson

A New Democratic Party government would protect pensions and prohibit companies from unilaterally changing the rules after an employee retires, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair said Tuesday.

Social security tribunal sat idle for much of first year

By: Lee-Anne Goodman The Canadian Press, Published on Fri Dec 05 2014

OTTAWA—The federal government announced two years ago it was creating a streamlined social security tribunal that would save Canadian taxpayers $25 million a year, but some well-paid new members had nothing to do during its first year of operation.

“The tribunal — the one that was supposed to save money — had 30-40 people making $100,000 a year sitting at home that first year,” Philippe Rabot, the commissioner of review tribunals from 2005 to 2010, said in an interview.

Report: Seniors increasingly struggling with debt, bankruptcy

 OTTAWA – The country’s growing cohort of senior citizens is carrying more debt into retirement and increasingly declaring bankruptcy, says a report prepared for the federal government.

The need to support dependent adult children who are taking longer to find work is contributing to the trend, says the study conducted for the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada.

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